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TRX Suspension Training: A guide for beginners

18th March 2021 | Refocus

TRX Suspension Training can be a great way to freshen up your training routine with a number of alternative ways to use the equipment to your benefit, whether that’s for speed, power, strength, flexibility or mobility.  


The whole premise of TRX is that any given movement can be performed at various levels of intensity. At its most simple, TRX Suspension Training is described as a dual-strap rope that allows you to suspend different parts of your body off the floor, enabling you to proactively engage your core into every movement you do.  


At the Club, you’ll find the TRX system in our Functional Fitness area, where you’ll find purposefully designed rigs designed to push your performance across a variety of disciplines. 


One of its biggest advantages is that it can be used in an extremely low impact manner, safeguarding your connective tissues and joints and protecting those with joint injuries from further problems.  


However, the opportunities span far beyond this. Nearly every movement you can perform on a machine or with free weights can be replicated on the TRX. For example, you could switch your bodyweight squat to a single-leg pistol squat on the TRX, using the handles for assistance.  


If you would like to try TRX Suspension Training for yourself, we’ve shared a number of exercises designed for beginners below. 

TRX for the beginner

We recommend a 30-minute routine for a beginner targeting all muscle groups. To begin, warm up and mobilise as you would prior to any workout. You’ll notice nearly every movement involves abdominal activation, which is another huge benefit of using TRX – you get a great core workout with movements that ordinarily isolate one body part. 


TRX Row


Similar to: 

Low pulley row


Muscles recruited: 

Read delts, biceps, lats, abdominals


Method:

Start by facing the TRX anchor point, take hold of the handles with a neutral grip (palms facing each other) and take a step forward so the TRX is taut then lean back slightly so the TRX is supporting your bodyweight. Your arms will now be straight and you’re ready to begin. Pulling through your arms bring your chest to meet your hands bending at the elbows and squeezing your shoulder blades together as you reach the top. Lower yourself back to your starting point under control to complete 1 rep.


TRX Chest Press


Similar to: 

Bench press


Muscles recruited: 

Chest, triceps, abdominals


Method:

Start by facing the TRX anchor point, take hold of the handles with a neutral grip (palms facing each other) and take a step forward so the TRX is taut then lean back slightly so the TRX is supporting your bodyweight. Your arms will now be straight and you’re ready to begin. Pulling through your arms bring your chest to meet your hands bending at the elbows and squeezing your shoulder blades together as you reach the top. Lower yourself back to your starting point under control to complete 1 rep.


TRX Bicep Curl


Similar to: 

Barbell curl, dumbbell curl


Muscles recruited: 

Biceps, abdominals


Method:

Stand facing the anchor point. Hold the TRX with a supine (underhand) grip. Take a step forward so only the TRX is holding your body weight. You begin the movement by bringing your hands to your chest by bending at the elbows. Core stability comes into play here as you’ll need to keep your back straight to allow the leverage to have its effect. Finish the repetition by extending your elbows slowly back to the starting point.


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TRX Rear Delt Flyes 


Similar to:

Rear dummbbell flies


Muscles recruited:

Rear delts, triceps, abdominals


Method:

Stand facing the anchor point with your arms straight out in front of you at shoulder height and your hands facing inwards. Next, separate your arms by squeezing your shoulder blades together. The further you spread your arms the more leverage you feel. Ideally at the end of the contraction both arms will be straight out at either side of your body. To repeat the repetition slowly reverse the movement.


TRX Assisted Squat


Similar to:

Squat, hack squat


Muscles recruited:

Quads, hamstrings, glutes, calves, abdominals


Method:

Begin by facing the anchor point, take hold of the TRX with a neutral grip and take all the slack so the TRX is supporting your bodyweight. Start the squat using the resistance of the TRX to assist you on the way down, the leverage supplied by the TRX should allow you to squat slightly lower, activating your glutes. To complete the rep, return to your starting point with slightly bent knees.


TRX Lunge


Similar to:

Bodyweight lunge


Muscles recruited:

Quads, hamstrings, glutes, calves, abdominals


Method:

Facing away from the anchor, place your left foot through both TRX handles, leaving your right foot planted. The movement begins by allowing your planted foot to bend (as it would in a squat) as your body lowers begin to stretch the foot in the TRX backwards. There’s no real need to go deeper than 90 degrees as the main focus of this movement is stability.


The takeaway

The above movements can be performed at higher rep ranges than their resistance-based counterparts. For each exercise, we recommend completing approximately 15 to 20 reps each set and around 45 seconds rest between each set.  As you perform these movements repeatedly over time, you’ll gradually increase your core stability and balance, and will be ready to perform advanced exercises using the TRX.  


For any support and advice on TRX Suspension Training, reach out to one of our trainers on the gym floor.  



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